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Latest News

The latest news from around the National Park System.

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park Launches Accessible Virtual Tours Of Historic Buildings

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park in Skagway, Alaska, has launched new virtual reality tours of park buildings. Now you can explore some of Skagway’s most significant historic buildings from home. Enjoy a stroll through the park museum, experience the fascinating Jeff. Smiths Parlor Museum, and see how a pioneer family lived at the Moore House.
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Friends Of The Smokies Awarded Grant To Promote Bear Safety On A.T.

Friends of the Smokies and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy will continue their partnership to assist Great Smoky Mountains National Park with proactive bear management. The ATC’s North Carolina specialty license plate grant program awarded Friends of the Smokies $4,000 to support repairs of food storage cables at campsites and shelters along the Smokies stretch of the Appalachian Trail.
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Saving Trees In National Parks Damaged By Hurricane Irma

Arborist Curtis Tilghman sees the national parks like no one else. He’s been in a tree over the grave of Thomas Edison. He’s cut branches under the shadow of the Statue of Liberty. He’s repaired tree damage in the Chalmette National Cemetery and cut trees from an airboat at the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve.
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Big Thicket National Preserve Recovering After Hurricane Harvey

As the Caribbean braces to take the brunt of a second hurricane in three weeks, parks in Texas are continuing to recover from destruction caused last month by Hurricane Harvey. The good news is that Big Thicket National Preserve, which experienced unprecedented flooding, is beginning to return to normal operations.
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UPDATE | Official: BLM Not Asked To Fact-Check Secretary Zinke's Monuments Draft

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's draft report on national monuments he believes should be reduced in size or opened to resource extraction was not run by U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials for fact-checking and contains a number of errors, according to agency officials.
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Secretary Zinke's Positions On National Monuments Link Him More Closely To Pinchot Than Roosevelt

Though he likes to be seen in the image of Theodore Roosevelt, by his actions Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke seems closer to Gifford Pinchot, the country's first chief of the U.S. Forest Service who viewed natural resources as existing to be consumed by people.
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National Parks Traveler's Essential Park Guide